Services

Services

Children’s Dentistry

Smiles For Your Child

At Magicland, we’re all about preventing tooth decay and starting good dental care habits early. While kids usually begin getting their permanent teeth around age six, it’s important that your kids learn proper dental hygiene and get the dental care they need at an early age.

Baby Teeth –  It’s important that your child’s baby teeth are cared for properly. They play a vital role in speech development and they help your child chew properly to help ensure good nutrition. They also help to maintain proper space so permanent teeth can come in correctly.

Checkups and Cleanings – Our experienced, kid-friendly professionals use a very gentle touch to carefully clean and polish your child’s teeth and check for cavities or other problems. For children this age, we recommend a checkup and cleaning every six months.

X-Rays – We may need to x-ray your child’s teeth, since that’s the best way to spot decay or other unseen problems and to make sure permanent teeth are coming in properly. At Magicland, we use digital x-rays that require less radiation and makes it easier to spot problems and show them to you. For a growing child, Magicland suggests x-rays once each year.

At the checkup, we’ll talk to you about fluoride, since it’s important that your child get the right amount.

Sealants on back teeth are an excellent, painless way to keep out food, plaque and acid that causes tooth decay. If your child needs a filling, we may suggest one that is tooth-colored so it will blend in and look natural.

To encourage children to be calm and at ease, we’ve designed our entire office to be very reassuring. If your child is more anxious, though, we have several sedation options that can help your child relax.

For more information, visit Did You Know?

To schedule an appointment for your child call Magicland Children’s Dental today.

Teen Dentistry

Top-Tier Teen Dentistry

When you get to be a teenager, both feeling good and looking good is very important. Magicland Children’s Dental is your family’s source for all things related to teen dentistry in Greater Los Angeles area. Education is one of our main concerns for all patients, so we teach teens how their diet affects tooth decay. Breads, dried fruit, and sticky food are harder to clean off teeth. Worse, decay-inducing sugar is found in some surprising places, such as ketchup and salad dressing. Having this knowledge empowers teens to take control of their oral health.

Along with brushing twice and flossing once every day, we recommend regular checkups and cleanings twice a year to keep those smiles gleaming and bright for school pictures and senior portraits. We also emphasize the importance of maintaining good habits for teenage dental health when they get out on their own. Teens are sure to love our experienced, Spanish speaking staff and what they can do. They’re welcome to visit every weekday and Saturday too, so they don’t have to miss school to keep their appointments.

Tooth alignment issues often begin during childhood. At Magicland Children’s Dental, our children’s orthodontics program is designed to help address such problems and help our toddlers and teens enjoy their smiles to the fullest.

Braces and Orthodontic Services

Straightening crooked teeth is a significant part of dental care for teens. Too often, they’re forced to go to a different office and start over with an unfamiliar doctor. Not so with us. Your teen can come to the same convenient location for orthodontic treatment that safely and gently helps perfect those smiles. We have a designated area where teens can relax in a setting suited to them.

Gentle Wisdom Teeth Removal

These last molars typically come in between the ages of 14 and 18, sometimes causing pain and infection. To spare your teen from these troubles, we check wisdom teeth for health and position during regular exams.

However, if there are ever any concerns or noticeable changes, please don’t hesitate to call and come in for an evaluation. That’s what our emergency services are for. Wisdom tooth extraction is best done by a qualified dentist your teen already knows and trusts. Magicland Children’s Dental is the practice that is perfect for maintaining the health and beauty of your teen’s smile.

Contact us to meet our Magicland staff. Call or text us at 888-329-8111!

Toddler Dentistry

Compassionate Toddler Dentistry

Good dental health starts with early care. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that a child’s first dental visit should be when their first tooth comes in. This is typically between the ages of six and twelve months. As they grow, more teeth will come in and require a little more upkeep than before. That’s why at Magicland Dental, we offer complete services for toddler dentistry.

As part of this care, we offer complimentary exams for children under two, so that we can take a proactive approach to their dental health. During this checkup, our team will assess your little one’s teeth, gums, and jaw to ensure they are developing correctly and that there are no early signs of problems. To learn more about our dental care for toddlers, or to discuss your child’s dental needs, reach out to our office.

Understanding Toddler Dental Health

There are a number of topics and issues that parents are commonly concerned with when it comes to their child’s dental care. Some of these topics include:

Teething: Toddler teething is a normal phase of your baby’s development. While some children experience minimal discomfort, others can struggle with irritation. If your baby is uncomfortable during teething, you can soothe their gums by rubbing them with a clean finger or a cool, smooth spoon. Once the tooth comes in, you should clean it with a soft, moistened cloth. As more teeth arrive, you can use a very soft baby’s toothbrush and toothpaste to clean them. Also, once your child’s teeth are side by side, you will need to gently floss them each day.

Baby Bottle Syndrome: Did you know that putting your baby to bed with a bottle can encourage tooth decay? Milk and juice can pool around your child’s teeth while they sleep and cause decay. This is often called baby bottle syndrome and is why you should ensure your baby finishes their bottle before you put them down.

Thumb or Finger Sucking: Most children will stop sucking their thumb by themselves as they age. However, if you feel your child’s habit is becoming a problem that could affect their dental health, then do not hesitate to bring it up with our team. We’re happy to offer suggestions to help.

Fluoride: One simple way to protect your toddler’s molars and teeth is with fluoride applications. Our staff is happy to help add this extra line of protection to your child’s dental care and will ensure that they are receiving the right amount of fluoride for their teeth.

Orthodontics

Kids Orthodontics

Tooth alignment issues often begin during childhood. At Magicland Children’s Dental, our children’s orthodontics program is designed to help address such problems and help our younger patients enjoy their smiles to the fullest.

Early Intervention

At Magicland Children’s Dental, we recognize that early intervention can often help kids avoid future orthodontic complications. Our children’s orthodontics program aims to identify alignment issues at the earliest possible state and incorporate preventative measures to minimize the overall scope of treatment.

Gentle Care

At Magicland Children’s Dental, we go out of our way to cater to kids. We understand that orthodontic treatment can be unappealing, if not frightening, to younger patients, so we do everything we can to put your child at ease. Our children’s orthodontics program is about more than just proper tooth alignment; it’s about making your child feel comfortable with his or her treatment every step of the way.

For more information about our children’s orthodontics services or to schedule a consultation for your child, call our office today.

Children’s Dentistry

Use a small, soft-bristled toothbrush to clean your baby’s teeth at least once per day, preferably at bedtime.

Pediatric dentists, also called pedodontists, are specially trained to care for your child’s teeth and mouth. With an additional two to three years of training in children’s dentistry, pedodontists have the experience to safeguard your child’s dental health from infancy through adolescence. Pediatric dentists also help children feel at ease and enthusiastic about caring for their teeth at home.

Of course, baby teeth affect how your child talks, chews and smiles. Baby teeth also help pave the way for adult teeth to emerge through the gums.

To help minimize pain and discomfort, use warm water to rinse the inflamed area of your child’s mouth and give your child oral acetaminophen. Then, make an appointment with your child’s pediatric dentist as soon as possible.

These habits are likely only to cause a problem for your child’s teeth if they continue past age 3. If needed, your child’s pediatric dentist can recommend a mouth appliance or distasteful medicine to apply to the thumb to discourage thumb-sucking.

Don’t put your child to sleep while nursing or give them a bedtime bottle that contains anything other than water. Keep up with your child’s schedule of regular dental checkups and cleanings, and clean your child’s teeth properly.

Most children should have a dental checkup and cleaning every six months. Your child’s pediatric dentist will make a recommendation tailored to his or her individual dental needs.

Start using toothpaste to brush your baby’s teeth as soon as they come through the gums. Apply a tiny smear (about the size of a grain of rice) of fluoride toothpaste to the toothbrush to clean your baby’s teeth twice each day. Older children (between ages 3 and 6) can start using a pea-sized amount of toothpaste to brush teeth.

Promoting healthy food choices, especially fruits and vegetables, is one of the best things you can do for your child’s dental health. Limit sugars, starches and carbohydrates to prevent tooth decay. Beware of how long sticky, sugary foods are allowed to remain on your child’s teeth before saliva or the toothbrush washes them away.

Teen Dentistry

It might be a good idea to brush with the radio on, since dentists generally recommend brushing three to four minutes, the average length of a song. Using an egg timer is another way to measure your brushing time. Patients generally think they’re brushing longer, but most spend less than a minute brushing.

To make sure you’re doing a thorough job and not missing any spots, patients are advised to brush the full three to four minutes twice a day, instead of brushing quickly five or more times through the day.

There are a number of effective brushing techniques. Patients are advised to check with their dentist or hygienist to determine which technique is best for them, since tooth position and gum condition vary. One effective, easy-to-remember technique involves using a circular or elliptical motion to brush a couple of teeth at a time, gradually covering the entire mouth.

Place a toothbrush beside your teeth at a 45-degree angle and gently brush teeth in an elliptical motion. Brush the outside of the teeth, inside the teeth, your tongue, the chewing surfaces and between teeth. Using a back-and-forth motion causes the gum surface to recede, can expose the root surface or make the root surface tender. You also risk wearing down the gum line.

Definitely, but most Americans don’t brush during the workday. Yet a survey by Oral-B Laboratories and the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) shows if you keep a toothbrush at work, the chances you will brush during the day increase by 65 percent.

Getting the debris off teeth right away stops sugary snacks from turning to damaging acids and catches starchy foods like potato chips before they turn to cavity-causing sugar. If you brush with fluoride toothpaste in the morning and before going to bed, you don’t even need to use toothpaste at work. You can just brush and rinse before heading back to your desk. If you don’t have a toothbrush, rinsing your mouth with water for 30 seconds after lunch also helps.

As more oral health product manufacturers introduce dental instruments to the consumer market, more patients are seeking treatment as a result of misuse of these devices, reports the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD).

AGD spokesperson Heidi Hausauer, DDS, says she frequently sees devices that resemble a scaler – an instrument used by dentists and dental hygienists for removing tartar and other deposits from the tooth surface – advertised in magazines and sold in drug stores.

“I’ve had people come into the office who have used these over-the-counter dental instruments and chipped their front tooth with them,” she says. “I’ve seen patients gauge roots and chip the enamel off lower incisors.”

Misuse of the devices also can lead to periodontal (gum) abscesses when tartar is pushed under the gumline.

While dentists and hygienists are trained in the proper use of dental instruments and removing tartar, they warn that patients attempting to do it themselves at home may do more harm than good. Rather than attempt to advise patients on proper use of these devices, many tell their patients it is safest to avoid using them at all.

“I would rather see the dentist or hygienist remove tartar,” says Dr. Hausauer. “Regular professional cleaning and dental visits are much healthier than buying something over the counter and picking at your teeth.”

Floss removes plaque and debris that adhere to teeth and gums in between teeth, polishes tooth surfaces and controls bad breath. By flossing your teeth daily, you increase the chances of keeping your teeth a lifetime and decrease your chance of having periodontal (gum) disease and tooth decay.

Flossing is the single most important weapon against plaque, perhaps more important than the toothbrush. Many people just don’t spend enough time flossing and many have never been taught to floss properly. When you visit your dentist or hygienist, ask to be shown.

 

Dental floss comes in many forms: waxed and unwaxed, flavored and unflavored, wide and regular. Wide floss, or dental tape, may be helpful for people with a lot of bridge work. Tapes are usually recommended when the spaces between teeth are wide. They all clean and remove plaque about the same. Waxed floss might be easier to slide between tight teeth or tight restorations. However, the unwaxed floss makes a squeaking sound to let you know your teeth are clean. Bonded unwaxed floss does not fray as easily as regular unwaxed floss but does tear more than waxed floss.

 

At least once a day. To give your teeth a good flossing, spend at least two or three minutes.

Toddler Dentistry

It might be a good idea to brush with the radio on, since dentists generally recommend brushing three to four minutes, the average length of a song. Using an egg timer is another way to measure your brushing time. Patients generally think they’re brushing longer, but most spend less than a minute brushing.

To make sure you’re doing a thorough job and not missing any spots, patients are advised to brush the full three to four minutes twice a day, instead of brushing quickly five or more times through the day.

There are a number of effective brushing techniques. Patients are advised to check with their dentist or hygienist to determine which technique is best for them, since tooth position and gum condition vary. One effective, easy-to-remember technique involves using a circular or elliptical motion to brush a couple of teeth at a time, gradually covering the entire mouth.

Place a toothbrush beside your teeth at a 45-degree angle and gently brush teeth in an elliptical motion. Brush the outside of the teeth, inside the teeth, your tongue, the chewing surfaces and between teeth. Using a back-and-forth motion causes the gum surface to recede, can expose the root surface or make the root surface tender. You also risk wearing down the gum line.

Definitely, but most Americans don’t brush during the workday. Yet a survey by Oral-B Laboratories and the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) shows if you keep a toothbrush at work, the chances you will brush during the day increase by 65 percent.

Getting the debris off teeth right away stops sugary snacks from turning to damaging acids and catches starchy foods like potato chips before they turn to cavity-causing sugar. If you brush with fluoride toothpaste in the morning and before going to bed, you don’t even need to use toothpaste at work. You can just brush and rinse before heading back to your desk. If you don’t have a toothbrush, rinsing your mouth with water for 30 seconds after lunch also helps.

As more oral health product manufacturers introduce dental instruments to the consumer market, more patients are seeking treatment as a result of misuse of these devices, reports the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD).

AGD spokesperson Heidi Hausauer, DDS, says she frequently sees devices that resemble a scaler – an instrument used by dentists and dental hygienists for removing tartar and other deposits from the tooth surface – advertised in magazines and sold in drug stores.

“I’ve had people come into the office who have used these over-the-counter dental instruments and chipped their front tooth with them,” she says. “I’ve seen patients gauge roots and chip the enamel off lower incisors.”

Misuse of the devices also can lead to periodontal (gum) abscesses when tartar is pushed under the gumline.

While dentists and hygienists are trained in the proper use of dental instruments and removing tartar, they warn that patients attempting to do it themselves at home may do more harm than good. Rather than attempt to advise patients on proper use of these devices, many tell their patients it is safest to avoid using them at all.

“I would rather see the dentist or hygienist remove tartar,” says Dr. Hausauer. “Regular professional cleaning and dental visits are much healthier than buying something over the counter and picking at your teeth.”

Floss removes plaque and debris that adhere to teeth and gums in between teeth, polishes tooth surfaces and controls bad breath. By flossing your teeth daily, you increase the chances of keeping your teeth a lifetime and decrease your chance of having periodontal (gum) disease and tooth decay.

Flossing is the single most important weapon against plaque, perhaps more important than the toothbrush. Many people just don’t spend enough time flossing and many have never been taught to floss properly. When you visit your dentist or hygienist, ask to be shown.

 

Dental floss comes in many forms: waxed and unwaxed, flavored and unflavored, wide and regular. Wide floss, or dental tape, may be helpful for people with a lot of bridge work. Tapes are usually recommended when the spaces between teeth are wide. They all clean and remove plaque about the same. Waxed floss might be easier to slide between tight teeth or tight restorations. However, the unwaxed floss makes a squeaking sound to let you know your teeth are clean. Bonded unwaxed floss does not fray as easily as regular unwaxed floss but does tear more than waxed floss.

 

At least once a day. To give your teeth a good flossing, spend at least two or three minutes.

Orthodontics

If you’ve ever wondered about the difference between a dentist and orthodontist, you’re not alone. Dentistry covers a broad category of medicine that deals with the teeth, gums, facial nerves and jaw. As a specialized form of dentistry, orthodontics focuses on the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of problems affecting the teeth and jaw.

 

Orthodontic devices are designed to improve your smile, bite and overall appearance. Orthodontists use various devices to move teeth safely and gradually.

Braces and aligners are orthodontic devices that apply gentle pressure to the teeth to adjust their position and alignment over time. Braces attach to the teeth and use tensioned wires to reposition teeth over an extended treatment period. Aligners are removable trays that gradually bring teeth into proper alignment.

Our orthodontic experts recommend starting orthodontic treatment during childhood when it’s the easiest to make adjustments to the teeth and jaw. In reality, however, it’s never too late to get adult braces or aligners. Orthodontic treatment can help improve your dental health and appearance at any age.

If your mouth is overcrowded or you have a tooth that’s creating problems, you may need to have a tooth extracted. This will create extra room in your mouth for your remaining teeth to align properly. Your orthodontist will carefully consider the size and shape of your mouth before recommending any extraction.

Your orthodontist will adjust the tension on your braces every few weeks. Your teeth may feel pressure following these adjustments. As the teeth shift in response to the adjustment, the pressure will subside.

Your orthodontist will adjust the tension on your braces every few weeks. Your teeth may feel pressure following these adjustments. As the teeth shift in response to the adjustment, the pressure will subside.

Sticky, chewy or hard foods can be damaging to braces. For example, sticky foods like gum and taffy can stick to your bands and wires pulling them off your teeth. Hard, crunchy foods can lead to broken brackets. If a food typically requires a large bite to eat (such as a hamburger, steak or apple), consider cutting it into smaller bites that you can pop into your mouth. It’s also wise to limit sugary foods to help protect your teeth from decay.

The best thing you can do to keep your teeth clean is to brush your teeth regularly — preferably after every time you eat or drink. Since braces can create hidden areas where food gets trapped, take your time when brushing. Tools such as an electric toothbrush and special toothpaste for sensitivity may make teeth cleaning easier and more effective. Remember to schedule regular dental cleanings with your dentist while you have braces.

If you’re wondering about caring for your teeth after braces, wearing your retainer is one of the most important steps. Once your braces are removed, you should wear your retainer day and night for about the same amount of time as your overall orthodontic treatment program. Following that period, you may wear your retainer at night for maintenance. Keep in mind that wearing your retainer regularly prevents your teeth from returning to their original position.

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