Toddler Dentistry Near You

Toddler Dentistry Near You

Toddler Dentistry Near You

Toddler Dentistry Near You

Compassionate Toddler Dentistry

Good dental health starts with early care. In fact, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that a child’s first dental visit should be when their first tooth comes in. This is typically between the ages of six and twelve months. As they grow, more teeth will come in and require a little more upkeep than before. That’s why at Magicland Dental, we offer complete services for toddler dentistry.

As part of this care, we offer complimentary exams for children under two, so that we can take a proactive approach to their dental health. During this checkup, our team will assess your little one’s teeth, gums, and jaw to ensure they are developing correctly and that there are no early signs of problems. To learn more about our dental care for toddlers, or to discuss your child’s dental needs, reach out to our office.

Understanding Toddler Dental Health

There are a number of topics and issues that parents are commonly concerned with when it comes to their child’s dental care. Some of these topics include:

Teething: Toddler teething is a normal phase of your baby’s development. While some children experience minimal discomfort, others can struggle with irritation. If your baby is uncomfortable during teething, you can soothe their gums by rubbing them with a clean finger or a cool, smooth spoon. Once the tooth comes in, you should clean it with a soft, moistened cloth. As more teeth arrive, you can use a very soft baby’s toothbrush and toothpaste to clean them. Also, once your child’s teeth are side by side, you will need to gently floss them each day.

Baby Bottle Syndrome: Did you know that putting your baby to bed with a bottle can encourage tooth decay? Milk and juice can pool around your child’s teeth while they sleep and cause decay. This is often called baby bottle syndrome and is why you should ensure your baby finishes their bottle before you put them down.

Thumb or Finger Sucking: Most children will stop sucking their thumb by themselves as they age. However, if you feel your child’s habit is becoming a problem that could affect their dental health, then do not hesitate to bring it up with our team. We’re happy to offer suggestions to help.

Fluoride: One simple way to protect your toddler’s molars and teeth is with fluoride applications. Our staff is happy to help add this extra line of protection to your child’s dental care and will ensure that they are receiving the right amount of fluoride for their teeth.

FAQ

It might be a good idea to brush with the radio on, since dentists generally recommend brushing three to four minutes, the average length of a song. Using an egg timer is another way to measure your brushing time. Patients generally think they’re brushing longer, but most spend less than a minute brushing. To make sure you’re doing a thorough job and not missing any spots, patients are advised to brush the full three to four minutes twice a day, instead of brushing quickly five or more times through the day.
There are a number of effective brushing techniques. Patients are advised to check with their dentist or hygienist to determine which technique is best for them, since tooth position and gum condition vary. One effective, easy-to-remember technique involves using a circular or elliptical motion to brush a couple of teeth at a time, gradually covering the entire mouth. Place a toothbrush beside your teeth at a 45-degree angle and gently brush teeth in an elliptical motion. Brush the outside of the teeth, inside the teeth, your tongue, the chewing surfaces and between teeth. Using a back-and-forth motion causes the gum surface to recede, can expose the root surface or make the root surface tender. You also risk wearing down the gum line.
Definitely, but most Americans don’t brush during the workday. Yet a survey by Oral-B Laboratories and the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) shows if you keep a toothbrush at work, the chances you will brush during the day increase by 65 percent. Getting the debris off teeth right away stops sugary snacks from turning to damaging acids and catches starchy foods like potato chips before they turn to cavity-causing sugar. If you brush with fluoride toothpaste in the morning and before going to bed, you don’t even need to use toothpaste at work. You can just brush and rinse before heading back to your desk. If you don’t have a toothbrush, rinsing your mouth with water for 30 seconds after lunch also helps.
As more oral health product manufacturers introduce dental instruments to the consumer market, more patients are seeking treatment as a result of misuse of these devices, reports the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD). AGD spokesperson Heidi Hausauer, DDS, says she frequently sees devices that resemble a scaler – an instrument used by dentists and dental hygienists for removing tartar and other deposits from the tooth surface – advertised in magazines and sold in drug stores. “I’ve had people come into the office who have used these over-the-counter dental instruments and chipped their front tooth with them,” she says. “I’ve seen patients gauge roots and chip the enamel off lower incisors.” Misuse of the devices also can lead to periodontal (gum) abscesses when tartar is pushed under the gumline. While dentists and hygienists are trained in the proper use of dental instruments and removing tartar, they warn that patients attempting to do it themselves at home may do more harm than good. Rather than attempt to advise patients on proper use of these devices, many tell their patients it is safest to avoid using them at all. “I would rather see the dentist or hygienist remove tartar,” says Dr. Hausauer. “Regular professional cleaning and dental visits are much healthier than buying something over the counter and picking at your teeth.”
Floss removes plaque and debris that adhere to teeth and gums in between teeth, polishes tooth surfaces and controls bad breath. By flossing your teeth daily, you increase the chances of keeping your teeth a lifetime and decrease your chance of having periodontal (gum) disease and tooth decay. Flossing is the single most important weapon against plaque, perhaps more important than the toothbrush. Many people just don’t spend enough time flossing and many have never been taught to floss properly. When you visit your dentist or hygienist, ask to be shown.
Dental floss comes in many forms: waxed and unwaxed, flavored and unflavored, wide and regular. Wide floss, or dental tape, may be helpful for people with a lot of bridge work. Tapes are usually recommended when the spaces between teeth are wide. They all clean and remove plaque about the same. Waxed floss might be easier to slide between tight teeth or tight restorations. However, the unwaxed floss makes a squeaking sound to let you know your teeth are clean. Bonded unwaxed floss does not fray as easily as regular unwaxed floss but does tear more than waxed floss.
At least once a day. To give your teeth a good flossing, spend at least two or three minutes.

Magicland Childrens Dental of Torrance

3820 W Sepulveda Blvd Torrance, CA 90505

310-792-5200

VISIT LOCATION

Magicland Childrens Dental of Pacoima

9745 Laurel Canyon Rd, Arleta, CA 91331

818-869-5000

VISIT LOCATION

Magicland Childrens Dental of Rialto

1205 W Renaissance Pkwy, Unit 240, Rialto, CA 92376

909-746-5000

VISIT LOCATION

Magicland Dental of Rancho Dominguez

1633 S Alameda St, Compton, CA 90220

310-627-5600

VISIT LOCATION

Magicland Dental of Moreno Valley

2862 Canyon Springs Pkwy, Suite A, Riverside, CA 92507

951-226-9252

VISIT LOCATION

FAQ

It might be a good idea to brush with the radio on, since dentists generally recommend brushing three to four minutes, the average length of a song. Using an egg timer is another way to measure your brushing time. Patients generally think they’re brushing longer, but most spend less than a minute brushing. To make sure you’re doing a thorough job and not missing any spots, patients are advised to brush the full three to four minutes twice a day, instead of brushing quickly five or more times through the day.
There are a number of effective brushing techniques. Patients are advised to check with their dentist or hygienist to determine which technique is best for them, since tooth position and gum condition vary. One effective, easy-to-remember technique involves using a circular or elliptical motion to brush a couple of teeth at a time, gradually covering the entire mouth. Place a toothbrush beside your teeth at a 45-degree angle and gently brush teeth in an elliptical motion. Brush the outside of the teeth, inside the teeth, your tongue, the chewing surfaces and between teeth. Using a back-and-forth motion causes the gum surface to recede, can expose the root surface or make the root surface tender. You also risk wearing down the gum line.
Definitely, but most Americans don’t brush during the workday. Yet a survey by Oral-B Laboratories and the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) shows if you keep a toothbrush at work, the chances you will brush during the day increase by 65 percent. Getting the debris off teeth right away stops sugary snacks from turning to damaging acids and catches starchy foods like potato chips before they turn to cavity-causing sugar. If you brush with fluoride toothpaste in the morning and before going to bed, you don’t even need to use toothpaste at work. You can just brush and rinse before heading back to your desk. If you don’t have a toothbrush, rinsing your mouth with water for 30 seconds after lunch also helps.
As more oral health product manufacturers introduce dental instruments to the consumer market, more patients are seeking treatment as a result of misuse of these devices, reports the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD). AGD spokesperson Heidi Hausauer, DDS, says she frequently sees devices that resemble a scaler – an instrument used by dentists and dental hygienists for removing tartar and other deposits from the tooth surface – advertised in magazines and sold in drug stores. “I’ve had people come into the office who have used these over-the-counter dental instruments and chipped their front tooth with them,” she says. “I’ve seen patients gauge roots and chip the enamel off lower incisors.” Misuse of the devices also can lead to periodontal (gum) abscesses when tartar is pushed under the gumline. While dentists and hygienists are trained in the proper use of dental instruments and removing tartar, they warn that patients attempting to do it themselves at home may do more harm than good. Rather than attempt to advise patients on proper use of these devices, many tell their patients it is safest to avoid using them at all. “I would rather see the dentist or hygienist remove tartar,” says Dr. Hausauer. “Regular professional cleaning and dental visits are much healthier than buying something over the counter and picking at your teeth.”
Floss removes plaque and debris that adhere to teeth and gums in between teeth, polishes tooth surfaces and controls bad breath. By flossing your teeth daily, you increase the chances of keeping your teeth a lifetime and decrease your chance of having periodontal (gum) disease and tooth decay. Flossing is the single most important weapon against plaque, perhaps more important than the toothbrush. Many people just don’t spend enough time flossing and many have never been taught to floss properly. When you visit your dentist or hygienist, ask to be shown.
Dental floss comes in many forms: waxed and unwaxed, flavored and unflavored, wide and regular. Wide floss, or dental tape, may be helpful for people with a lot of bridge work. Tapes are usually recommended when the spaces between teeth are wide. They all clean and remove plaque about the same. Waxed floss might be easier to slide between tight teeth or tight restorations. However, the unwaxed floss makes a squeaking sound to let you know your teeth are clean. Bonded unwaxed floss does not fray as easily as regular unwaxed floss but does tear more than waxed floss.
At least once a day. To give your teeth a good flossing, spend at least two or three minutes.
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